Monday, 12 August 2013

THE 'DAIVA' INSCRIPTION - PERSEPOLIS, IRAN - THE SANSKRIT CONNECTION

The Daiva, Inscription.
Paraspura (Persepolis) Iran
Dated around 500 BC
In one of the lines, the Daiva (or Deva Inscription) at Persepolis (ancient name Paraspura), Iran, dated to around 500 BC says, 'pasāva vašnā Auramazdāha adam avam daivadānam viyakanam' and is translated from Old Persian as 'Afterwards, by the favor of Ahura-mazdā, I destroyed that temple of the Daivas.' The Daiva Inscription was placed at the Persepolis temple on the orders of King Xerses (Persian name:  Khshayarsha), who lived from 520 to 465 BC and was the grandson of King Cyrus (his name is recorded in Iranian annals as Kambhoja) and the son of King Darius (Persian name - Daresh).

The entire Daiva inscription can be decoded with the help of Sanskrit. Here is the decode of a section (
pasāva vašnā Auramazdāha adam avam daivadānam viyakanam) with the help of Sanskrit.

The Old Persian 'Pasava' is derived from and is a simplification of the Sanskrit 'pasch' (पश्च) which means 'later'. It is from the root 'pasch' that the Sanskrit (and Hindi) 'paschat' (पश्चात्) is derived.

In Sanskrit, 'purva' (
पूर्व) means 'before' and it also means 'East'. 'Pasch' (पश्च) means 'later' and it also means 'West'. Sun rises in the 'East' 'before' it does in the 'West' (where it rises 'later)'. Hence 'purva' (East, before) and 'pascha' (West, later). This is the kind of logic that is woven into Sanskrit and is missing from other languages.

The next two words 'vasana Auramazdāha' is translated from Old Persian as 'by the favour of Auramazdaha'. However in Sanskrit 'vasana' (
वासना) means 'wish' or 'desire'. The two words would therefore mean 'as desired by Auramazadaha'.

'Adam' is translated from Old Persian as 'I' and is a distortion of the Sanskrit 'aham' (
अहम् ) which means 'I'.

'Avam' is translated from Old Persian as 'this' or 'that'. In Sanskrit, 'idam' (
इदम् ) and 'etat' (एतत्) both mean 'this'.

'Daivadana' is translated from Old Persian as 'temple of the daivas'. In Sanskrit, the word is 'devadham' (देवधाम) that is the 'dhama' of the devas' - 'dham' (
धाम) means 'abode', hence 'abode of God'.

'Viyakanam' is translated from Old Persian as 'destroyed'. In Sanskrit, 'viya' (वियम्) means 'rip apart'. 'Viya' is a compound word, where 'vi' (
वि) means 'apart' or 'asunder' and 'ya' (या) means 'to set out' or 'move away'.

The name 'Azuramazda' is also a distortion of the Sanskrit 'Asura-medira' (असुर- मेधिर). In Sanskrit 'medira' means intelligent. Asuramedira was the name of God Varuna in the Vedic context. During the Vedic times and early Hinduism, the Asura and Devas were all worshipped. It was only later that there was a divide.

Suggested Link:
The Asura
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